Symbolism of The Sun Also Rises

See the full review of this book, The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway in the Review Section

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Of course this book is full of symbolism, beginning with the very title. Much of it just boils down to a writer obsessed with masculinity. That obsession takes us to bullfighting, which is itself symbolic of sexual seduction, when two beings face each other in a game of skill, where one wins and the other is really hurt or even killed with a sword. Sex seems to be a symbol of masculinity, rather than an object of it.

The story starts in Paris, which symbolizes romance, where Jake's lost love, Brett, meets with him. He tells her of a war wound that has left him impotent. Brett tells him she loves him and always will, but she rejects him because of his impotence. Jake gathers up some friends, also from the lost generation, and they go to Spain for the bullfights and other macho activities. Brett goes with them.

The chapters on bullfighting flip back and forth complimenting their fly fishing trip, drinking, sex other very masculine activities.  

Hemingway's outlook seems to be summed up by two of his characters, Cohn and Jake, when they say, "I can't stand it to think my life is going so fast and I'm not really living it." "Nobody ever lives life all the way up except bull-fighters"